Fragile Definitive Edition, mixed by Steven Wilson – part 1- 217

 

Fagile
CD/Blu-ray purchased 2016

Despite what I say at the beginning of the episode, this is definitely episode 217. I finally manage to crack open my copy of the Steven Wilson Fragile remixes. Also, Mark Anthony K spins Rick Wakeman’s Sea Airs and there’s a news round up.

  • What has Steven Wilson managed to find in the archives?
  • How does the new version of Fragile ‘feel’?
  • Why might Mark fall asleep at the wheel listening to this Wakeman record?

Listen to the episode and then let me know what you think!

Show notes and links

Release Release cover by Concertos Dana

Stephen Soderbergh 9012Live tour behind the scenes

MTV Rockumentary 1991

Preston Frazier’s SomethingElseReviews – The Fish from Fragile

Miguel Falcao’s latest cover – Soft as A Dove

Knifeworld – High/Aflame

Jorden Rudess – Sound Chaser

Bob Keeley’s band!

 

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Theme music

The music I use is the last movement of Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite. This has been used as introduction music at many Yes concerts. My theme music is not take from a live concert – I put it together from the following two creative commons sources: thanvannispen and archive.org
About the Author

Kevin

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3 thoughts on “Fragile Definitive Edition, mixed by Steven Wilson – part 1- 217

  1. I’ve only just stumbled across your podcasts and congratulate you on the effort you have put in, clearly a devoted fan as am I – since I sat in awe at my first Yes concert – Tales from Topographic Oceans at Liverpool Empire in 1973.

  2. I am perplexed why the solo features on “Fragile” are so often given short-shrift. I think Wakeman’s “Cans and Brahms” is marvelous, if not completely unique from anything I have ever heard anywhere else. I wonder if it is due to it’s brief length that deems it “unworthy” of being a standout Yes song? This being said, I believe there are several other brilliant Yes tunes that get overlooked due to their being less than 2 minutes long. “Vevey (Parts 1 and 2) are incredibly powerful pieces and a joy to hear, but I never hear any mentions of them. Is it because there are no lyrics?

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