Yes singles part 12 – Big Generator – 331

Love Will Find A Way 7 in and 12 in
Love Will Find A Way 7 in and 12 in

Produced by Robert Nasir, Jeffrey Crecelius, Wayne Hall, Preston Frazier and Bill Govier

Big Generator took a long time to create but, fear not, this episode isn’t quite as long as that process was. We look at the singles generated by Big Generator and we also consider what extras might be included on new studio albums today.

  • Was Big Generator as good as 90125?
  • What about the singles?
  • Is this more like Yes music?

Listen to the episode then let us know what you think!

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Show notes and links

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Robert Nasir | Jeffrey Crecelius | Preston Frazier | Bill Govier | Wayne Hall |

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Theme music

The music I use is the last movement of Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite. This has been used as introduction music at many Yes concerts. My theme music is not take from a live concert – I put it together from the following two creative commons sources: thanvannispen and archive.org

10 thoughts on “Yes singles part 12 – Big Generator – 331”

  1. Well done as always. Thank you for all the hard work you put in. ABWH put out a good album and the tour was superb, that will be interesting.

    I must go now an indulge in many hours of Yes dance mixes!!!

  2. Very interesting episode for sure wow I never knew that Big Generator cost 2 million dollars to make ..Wow
    Never cared for any of the dance mix stuff but if your into that stuff I guess….

    Oh I forgot I did receive my Chris Squires Fish out of water worth every penny! I wish I had the three or four originals I had back in the day however they were truly played out for sure.

    Oh and again thanks to Mark I’m totally into vinyl and I only have one store that is even close to me and seem to be a bit high in prices, so I’m at the mercy of online shopping and have been slowly buying my old favorites new and they do sound great.
    Any one who could give me any Ideas where I could go online to find more vinyl would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks guys great show as always!

    1. Hey Paul,
      Thanks for the kind words! I’m glad you got your Fish out of Water boxset…I’m still waiting!!
      And I’m glad I got you back into record collecting. ..I find it very enjoyable.

      Mark Anthony K

  3. This was not an episode up to your usual high standard. It was beyond and before fabulous! The honesty and humor along with diligence in research is much appreciated. Thanks, Jeff C

    1. Hey Jeffrey,
      Wow..thank you so much for those words of praise. I’m glad that you enjoy the episodes. ..Kevin and me have a great time researching the topics…it’s worth it knowing that people like them.

      Mark

  4. Hey guys. As usual a great episode. Some comments to add to the Two Pence.

    Recently I attended a talk at my old school by Ian Harper of Future Games of London. You may not know the company but may know the mobile app / game Hungry Shark – which is downloaded somewhere in the world 100 times per minute… Oh and it’s free, which is relevant. In the talk he went through the journey he has had in the changing world of software. When Hungry Shark World launched in 2016 it had 10 million downloads in 6 days (remember free!). So how do you build a business on that???

    Well in his talk Ian showed us an inverse exponential curve (Google it) with an x axis of no of sales and a y axis of price. What he explained was that for software, the largest number of people will “buy” of the price is zero. So in order to have a business what you have to do is monetise the underneath of the curve. So at the y axis you will have the people who buy every add on or upgrade in the game no matter what (his example was of a famous UK football player WR who they believe buys ever Hungry Shark variation or add on). Then there are a group of people who will spend varying amounts depending on what is offered. Someone may spend £1 to get a bigger shark and some may pay £5 to get unlimited lives allowing them to get through the levels etc.

    He explained (yes I’m getting to the point) that the music industry has gone the same way. The default price is currently zero (due to free downloads and arguably streaming). You can get all music for basically free. So to actually continue to exist record companies have to identify and find ways to sell things to that (small) group of people who will spend more than “free”, thereby making production of music viable.

    That’s one of the reasons why the return of vinyl is very interesting. When CDS came out they were more expensive than vinyl and the record companies told us that CDs sounded much better and were indestructible so we would pay the extra price and because most people had had bad sounding albums or scratches or warped discs. Of course now the message has changed – vinyl sounds better, artwork looks better, and so you should pay a premium price to get this).

    What’s my point? Well the reason for the deluxe editions, reissues, bonus tracks is quite simple. It’s not because the companies what to give us more music – it’s because for bands and artists to survive, they need to sell some sort to people – in reality it’s only those at the very extreme who would pay twice for exactly the same thing. But as you move along the axis, more people are likely to want to spend money on an album they already have if they get something different or extra etc with it.

    And presumably it’s partly about timing of when you put those out… As you discussed, is it all at once or at the start. “Talk” is a good example. The record Co who owned it went bust. Someone else bought it – and so in 2002 when it got reissued, they added an extra track plus some extra stuff in the booklet. Part of the purpose was to get an album back on the shelves. But the extra track draws in those who may have already bought it. I’m not suggesting that was deliberate or planned to rob the fans – but they recognise that people will/ may rebuy an album if something else is added!

    What should we do? Well the answer is – you have a choice!

  5. Kevin Mulryne and Mark Anthony K – they listen to the dance remixes so you don’t have to.

    (Timbales – heh, heh)

  6. Big Generator was a surprise for me. I thought, (once again), that Yes had folded it’s tent after 90125. (No internet back then). I was pulling a shift as a security guard in a guard shack in Tennessee, and listening to Casey Kassems top 40 countdown show on the radio on afternoon, and “Love Will Find A Way” was being debuted on the show. I was overjoyed to hear that voice and that bass again. So rumors of Yes’ death were once again hooey. I Bought the album the first time I saw it in the store. Took it home and recorded it onto cassette for the car, and listened to it for several months pretty much non-stop, and LOUD. Now days, I still put BG(the song), Shoot High – Aim Low, Final Eyes, and Holy Lamb onto quite a few playlists. I wouldn’t be blown away by Yes again until the Union concert, and then the Talk album and Concert. ABWH and Union (the albums) just never really did it for me.

  7. Holy Lamb should have been extended? Well there is always the live version linking Holy Lamb with Wurm.

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